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Wild Music in the News

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Updated: 1 year 29 weeks ago

Small rural owl fearlessly colonizes the city

September 17, 2015 - 10:22am
Think of the city and images of traffic, pollution, noise and crowds spring to mind. The metropolis doesn't seem to be the most ideal habitat for any animals other than humans. However, Spanish and Argentinean scientists have demonstrated that some species, such as the burrowing owl, have spent decades closing in on the city from the country without suffering from stress.

Small rural owl fearlessly colonizes the city

September 17, 2015 - 9:01am
Think of the city and images of traffic, pollution, noise and crowds spring to mind. The metropolis doesn't seem to be the most ideal habitat for any animals other than humans. However, Spanish and Argentinean scientists have demonstrated that some species, such as the burrowing owl, have spent decades closing in on the city from the country without suffering from stress.

Small rural owl fearlessly colonizes the city

September 16, 2015 - 10:00pm
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Think of the city and images of traffic, pollution, noise and crowds spring to mind. The metropolis doesn't seem to be the most ideal habitat for any animals other than humans. However, Spanish and Argentinean scientists have demonstrated that some species, such as the burrowing owl, have spent decades closing in on the city from the country without suffering from stress.

Birds that eat at feeders more likely to get sick, spread disease

September 16, 2015 - 10:00pm
(Virginia Tech) The authors monitored the social and foraging behaviors of wild flocks of house finches, a common backyard songbird, and the spread of a naturally-occurring bird disease called Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis, which is similar to 'pink eye' in humans but cannot be contracted by humans.

Birds that eat at feeders are more likely to get sick, spread disease

September 16, 2015 - 4:51pm
The authors monitored the social and foraging behaviors of wild flocks of house finches, a common backyard songbird, and the spread of a naturally-occurring bird disease called Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis, which is similar to "pink eye" in humans but cannot be contracted by humans.

California court makes it tougher for music, movie industries to take down Web postings

September 16, 2015 - 9:30am
For a Pennsylvania mom who has waged a closely watched Silicon Valley legal battle for nearly 10 years with the music industry, it appears, perhaps, her baby should have simply been allowed to dance to a Prince song on YouTube after all.

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

September 16, 2015 - 9:29am
A pioneering ultrasonic device can significantly improve the cleaning of medical instruments and reduce contamination and risk of infection, researchers have demonstrated. StarStream makes water more efficient for cleaning by creating tiny bubbles which automatically scrub surfaces. The device supplies a gentle stream of water through a nozzle that generates ultrasound and bubbles, which dramatically improve the cleaning power of water reducing the need for additives and heating.

Ultra-thin noise suppression sheets with the world's highest permeability

September 16, 2015 - 6:30am
TDK Corporation presents the ultra-thin IFL16 noise suppression sheet: The sheet has a thickness of just 0.03 mm or 0.05 mm, depending on type, making it 20 percent thinner than existing sheets with the same performance. At this thickness the new material offers the world's highest magnetic permeability of 220 µ´ at 1 MHz (typ.). IFL16 is designed for a temperature range of between -40 °C and +85 °C and is suitable for the frequency range from 0.5 MHz to 1000 MHz. The standard size of the sheet is 300 mm x 200 mm. The sheet can also be supplied on a roll (300 mm x 100 m). The new sheet extends the existing TDK product spectrum of noise suppression sheets of types IFL10M and IFL12. Volume production will start in September 2015.

Noise may shorten sparrow lives, study finds

September 16, 2015 - 12:53am
The noise of cars honking and zooming through the streets may shorten the lifespan of sparrows growing up near the clamour, scientists said Wednesday.

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

September 15, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Southampton) Researchers from the University of Southampton have demonstrated how a pioneering ultrasonic device can significantly improve the cleaning of medical instruments and reduce contamination and risk of infection.

Why middle class people are more likely to play music, paint and act revealed

September 15, 2015 - 7:13pm
The reason why middle class people are more likely to play music, paint and act has been revealed in a major new study. Research involving 78,000 people found that it was not wealth or social status that were strongly linked to people taking part in arts activities as amateurs or professionals, but rather, the level of education that lay behind arts participation.

The reason why middle class people are more likely to play music, paint and act revealed

September 15, 2015 - 4:00pm
The reason why middle class people are more likely to play music, paint and act has been revealed in a major new study.

US seizes music-sharing website

September 14, 2015 - 9:42am
US authorities have seized the website of Sharebeast, said to be the largest illegal music-sharing operation based on the United States.

Marine Life Needs Protection from Noise Pollution

September 14, 2015 - 5:30am
Conservationists are calling for international regulations to limit noise from shipping and seismic surveys

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Discovery of a highly efficient catalyst eases way to hydrogen economy

September 13, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) 'In the hydrogen evolution reaction, the whole game is coming up with inexpensive alternatives to platinum and the other noble metals,' says Song Jin, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In the online edition of Nature Materials that appears today, Jin's research team reports a hydrogen-making catalyst containing phosphorus and sulfur -- both common elements -- and cobalt, a metal that is 1,000 times cheaper than platinum.

Star-studded “Love Song to the Earth” makes us hope climate change wins

September 11, 2015 - 1:40pm

Some people camp out for days to get a glimpse of T-Swift. Some people get all jittery when the latest Fetty Wap single drops. But here at Grist HQ, our shivers are inspired by the likes of this:

Paul McCartney, Jon Bon Jovi, Sheryl Crow, Fergie, Natasha Bedingfield, Leona Lewis and Sean Paul are among the 16 international artists who have lent their voices to “Love Song to the Earth.” Recorded to help spur action on global climate change … the song will go into wide release on Sept. 11.

This is it. The turning point. The moment that everything will change, because people are … not going to listen to this.

People are not going to listen to this so hard.

Oh don’t get us wrong. Lyrics like “Looking down from up on the moon you’re a tiny blue marble/Who’d have thought the ground we stand on could be so fragile” are undeniably original and inspiring. No doubt there are hordes of 12-year-olds ready to sit up, take notice, and recycle that Coke can. Because Sir Paul said so.

But we think the music industry can do better. So many millions of dollars, and they still haven’t made the environmental movement and climate change seem irrelevant and boring enough. So we put our heads together and came up with a few ideas for the next heavy-handed billboard smash, featuring the most so-yesterday artists we could think of:

1. Green Day: “Green Day”

2. Hootie & The Blowfish ft. Trey Anastasio of Phish: “But Seriously, Let’s Talk About Sustainable Fisheries”

3. Billy Joel: “Where Is the Miami I Once Knew (A Lullaby)”

4. Cam’ron: “Killa Haze (Our Ozone Problem)”

5. Hall & Oates: “Inflated Agricultural Subsidies are the Only Reason Organic Food Seems So Expensive, Girl”

6. Chingy: “Wind Powurr”

7. Mystikal: “Cap N Trade Wif Me”

8. Dave Grohl, Chad Kroeger, and Slash: “Restringing Earth’s Guitar”

9. Billy Ray Cyrus and Whitesnake: “Please Don’t Forget to Turn the Lights Off When You Leave the Room”

10. Ginuwine: “Is There Any More Room for Me (In Your Carbon Market)”

11. No Doubt, Soundgarden, and the Goo Goo Dolls: “Hey, How About Plants?”

12. Vanilla Ice: “Ice Melt, Baby”

13. Bonnie Tyler ft. Steven Tyler: “Carbon Cap Shuffle”

14. The Proclaimers: “You Should Walk Because It’s Less Carbon-Intensive Than Driving”

15. Carly Rae Jepsen: “The Arctic is Melting (Boy From Saturday)”

Anyone got anything even less relevant to add?

Call us, Clive. We feel an album coming on.

[UPDATE: When other outlets trashed this song they were at least polite enough to point out that all the proceeds go to a good cause, which we neglected to do. So hey, we’re doing it! Go buy the song — or make a donation directly to the green group of your choice. We’re all in this hot, stuffy recording studio together.]


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Living, Science

Automatic live subtitling system being trialed in academic conferences

September 11, 2015 - 7:50am
An automatic subtitling system powered by the speech recognition technology which is under development at Kyoto University made its debut on 22 August at the inaugural meeting of the Assistive and Accessible Computing (AAC) Study Group of the Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ). The system is intended to help people with hearing difficulties and is scheduled to be trialed over an extended term in academic conferences.

Marine life needs protection from noise pollution

September 10, 2015 - 6:00pm
Conservationists call for international regulations to limit noise from shipping and seismic surveys.

Female mice sing for sex

September 10, 2015 - 4:51pm
Male mice belt out love songs to females during courtship. What scientists didn't know until now is female mice sing back. Using a sophisticated array of microphones and a sound chamber he developed, a researcher discovered the world is full of tiny furry Beyonces. Studying all the Single Ladies' communication provides insight into brain mechanics and impairments, potentially including those related to autism.

Experiments illuminate supersonic radiation flow

September 10, 2015 - 5:20am
A multi-institutional team of scientists fired the 26th and final shot of the Pleiades experimental campaign at the National Ignition Facility last month. The campaign has created a new scientific foundation for the study of supersonic radiation flow in astrophysical phenomena and in inertial confinement fusion physics.