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Updated: 4 years 44 weeks ago

Norepinephrine aids brain in sorting complex auditory signals

June 23, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) In the Journal of Neuroscience this week, doctoral student Maaya Ikeda and her advisor, neuroscientist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report finding that the neuromodulator norepinephrine has an unexpected, direct action on auditory processing of complex signals, specifically bird songs in the zebra finch.

Eavesdropping on the body: New device tracks chemical signals within cells

June 23, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering) Biomedical engineers at the University of Toronto have invented a new device that more quickly and accurately 'listens in' on the chemical messages that tell our cells how to multiply. The tool improves our understanding of how cancerous growth begins, and could identify new targets for cancer medications.

Road traffic noise linked to deaths, increased strokes

June 23, 2015 - 6:01pm
Living in an area with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy. Research has found a link between long-term exposure to road traffic noise and deaths, as well as a greater risk of stroke, particularly in the elderly.

Someone accidentally ate a GMO lamb with jellyfish DNA — and nothing happened

June 23, 2015 - 1:54pm

It sounds like a setup to a horror movie: A lamb genetically modified with jellyfish DNA — to glow in the dark! (well, kinda) — was accidentally sold to a slaughterhouse, where it eventually made its way to someone’s plate in France. But the horror stopped there, as far as we know — no fluorescent French diners, no stung tongues, no human consequences of any kind. But it’s still pretty gross. From The Verge:

A lamb that was genetically modified with jellyfish DNA was sold for consumption in France, according to a report today from French newspaper Le Parisien. The lamb, named “Ruby,” was part of a “Green Sheep” research program at France’s National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), where scientists used it to study the impacts of various implants used in people with heart failure. The lamb was born in 2014 to a mother whose DNA had been modified with a green fluorescent protein (GFP), which gave it a bright color and made its skin transparent.

In a press release published after Le Parisien‘s report, INRA said it believes Ruby was transferred from the lab as part of a malicious act carried out by employees whose names have not been released. The agency also says it suspended the person responsible for selling the lamb, adding that its investigation revealed “tensions and dysfunction” among leadership at the site where she was held. An INRA official tells Le Parisien that if charged and convicted, the perpetrators could face a fine of €75,000 and one year in prison.

In short: Merde!

 


Filed under: Food, Living, Science

Video: Why do we love music?

June 23, 2015 - 10:38am
Whether it's rock, hip-hop, classical or deep house, everyone has a favorite kind of music. But why do we love to throw on the headphones and get lost in the beat? It turns out that chemistry plays a big role in your favorite tunes.

Google adds free ad-supported tier to music app in the US

June 23, 2015 - 10:28am
Google is adding a free tier to its subscription streaming music service in the U.S., aiming to convert the millions of people who click on the Google Play Music app every month but turn away because they're prompted for payment information.

Why do we love music? (video)

June 22, 2015 - 10:00pm
(American Chemical Society) Whether it's rock, hip-hop, classical or deep house, everyone has a favorite kind of music. But why do we love to throw on the headphones and get lost in the beat? It turns out that chemistry plays a big role in your favorite tunes. Watch this week's Reactions episode, featuring a special appearance from BrainCraft's Vanessa Hill, to find out why.

Driving with the wrong music genre can be deadly, according to new book

June 22, 2015 - 10:00pm
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Brodsky maintains that choice of music can have a major influence on driving, and, in some circumstances, lead to serious and even fatal outcomes. In fact, the National Higway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that driver inattention, including music distraction, is a contributing factor in 25 to 30 percent of the 1.2 million crashes per year in the US.

Apple's about-face reveals cracks in music industry

June 22, 2015 - 5:20pm
Apple's abrupt about-face on paying royalties for songs during a three-month free-trial period for its new music service was a symbolic victory for superstar Taylor Swift and other artists, and a shrewd business move by Apple, at a time when the streaming phenomenon is causing major changes in the music industry.

Dropping the volume around schools can improve learning

June 22, 2015 - 7:00am
There's no escaping noise, whether it's caused by traffic, construction, or planes flying overhead. Usually we have no choice but to get on with our daily lives and in many instances noise is little more than an annoyance. But children may be affected differently to adults, particularly when continuous noise is an environmental feature of their place of learning.

Users to fine-tune hearing aids themselves

June 22, 2015 - 5:12am
More than 20 per cent of people with hearing aids use their devices for less than one hour a day because of problems they encounter with tuning the settings. But now users can participate in fine-tuning their devices themselves.

Silent flights: How owls could help make wind turbines and planes quieter

June 22, 2015 - 1:01am
An investigation into how owls fly and hunt in silence has enabled researchers to develop a prototype coating for wind turbine blades that could significantly reduce the amount of noise they make.

Magnitude 6.5 Earthquake Strikes Fiji Islands

June 21, 2015 - 5:42pm

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [...] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving [...] FIJI ISLANDS - The U.S. Geological Survey says a strong earthquake struck in the Fiji Islands region, but a tsunami is not expected. The 6.5-magnitude quake struck at 1:28 p.m. with its epicenter about 26 miles east northeast of Ndoi Island, Fiji.

Silent flights: How owls could help make wind turbines and planes quieter

June 21, 2015 - 5:39pm
A newly designed material, which mimics the wing structure of owls, could help make wind turbines, computer fans and even planes much quieter. Early wind tunnel tests of the coating have shown a substantial reduction in noise without any noticeable effect on aerodynamics.

13 key questions about Apple Music (+video)

June 21, 2015 - 3:16pm

Apple unveiled Apple Music at WWDC 2015. How does this new music streaming service work?

Silent flights: How owls could help make wind turbines and planes quieter

June 20, 2015 - 10:00pm
(University of Cambridge) A newly designed material, which mimics the wing structure of owls, could help make wind turbines, computer fans and even planes much quieter. Early wind tunnel tests of the coating have shown a substantial reduction in noise without any noticeable effect on aerodynamics.

Magnitude 2.6 Earthquake Rumbles Through Antioch

June 19, 2015 - 10:57am

CBS San Francisco Connect With Us At KPIX 5 PROGRAM GUIDE: KPIX 5 TV Schedule WATCH: A Glimpse Inside The Working KPIX 5 Newsroom Breaking News Send news tips, video & photos, and video to the KPIX 5 [] CONNECT WITH KCBS Welcome to KCBS All News 740AM & 106.9FM on CBSSanFrancisco.com! LISTEN LIVE RIGHT NOW: KCBS Live Audio Stream LIKE KCBS Radio On Facebook: KCBS is the Bay Area's only all news station, serving [] ANTIOCH - The United States Geological Survey reports that an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 2.6 struck near Antioch and Brentwood Friday morning. Strong earthquakes with an epicenter off the coast can trigger tsunamis, depending on the size and type of the fault movement.

It's not just hype – 3D printing is the bridge to the future

June 19, 2015 - 7:30am
A company in the Netherlands is building a bridge across a canal in Amsterdam using 3D-printing robots. It seems that such attention-grabbing headlines appear regularly to declare how 3D-printing is destined to revolutionise manufacturing of all kinds. If the idea that key manufacturing products such as cars, aircraft – or indeed bridges – built by 3D printing sounds like hype, you're mistaken.

How bats actually fly to find their prey

June 19, 2015 - 6:46am
New research helps elucidate how bats actually fly to find their prey. Every night a bat puts in 600-700 kilometres of airtime. Flying low, the animals catch insects at speeds of around 40 metres per second. At night the bat uses its hearing to navigate its way to prey. Bats catch insects continuously using echolocation, an advanced navigation system.

Reducing the Japanese beetle population

June 19, 2015 - 5:00am
On an overcast morning in May, 15 people sit on bales of hay in a semi-circle while listening to Ana Legrand, an assistant extension professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture. The workshop attendees are here to learn about UConn's efforts to reduce the population of Japanese beetle larvae (white grubs) without chemical intervention.